Getting stuffed

Well, here I was thinking that being poisoned, butchered, pierced countless times and grilled was all that was on the menu of the cancer treatment! One thing sure in life, though is that we should always expect the unexpected! 😉

The radiologists in Cambridge were right warning me that the side effects of rads would be building up for up to two weeks after the treatment. I wasn’t, however, prepared to have four degree burns, causing an abscess under one of my post op scars! Shortly after I was done with the rads, I started having this sky high fever of 39/40C! This is quite uncommon for me and so it immediately worried me, let alone knocking me down. I have been advised to take paracetamol so many times by GPs and for so many various conditions, that I just thought I would resort to this NHS approved, magical drug and beat the fever! 😉 It didn’t work, surprise, surprise! Last week, on Monday I went to the oncology unit of Bedford hospital, hoping to see my oncologist and get some help. She was not in, but one of the breast care nurses were on duty and, after seeing the swollen abscess, she took me to the A&E where I was kept the whole, bloody day…. 😦 Blood tests were done, a surgeon saw me and he wanted to send me home we some sort of an ointment, but, thank God, my bloods were not ok and they kept me in. Only sitting there for the whole day before being taken to the ward was a true torment, especially that I was still battling that awful fever. Then, the cannula horror began again…..

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Finally, after four different doctors failed to put a cannula in my arm, an anaesthetist was called for help, so success no 1:

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Unfortunately, the wrist is not the best place to keep a cannula long term and it came out after two doses of the antibiotic were injected into me. Another anaesthetist came to my rescue:

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Success again! I officially love all anaesthetists!!! 😀 I asked one of them about what it is that makes them succeed in cannulating horribly tiny veins. He said: ‘we just have to get access to the veins, there is no other option; so we just do…. ‘ 🙂

I am still bruised after the multiple ‘sharp scratches’ (an NHS slang for injections…. most of which are a little more than a scratch! lol) given to me by the medics.

In the morning after the first night spent in the hospital, I was seen by my surgeon and he drained quite a lot of the nasty content of the abscess. It almost immediately brought a huge relief. He opened the abscess and stuffed it with gauze so that it heals from the inside out. That with the iv antibiotics dealt with the fever pretty quickly, so I was discharged on Thursday, to my great delight! 😀 I was given a bag full of dressings, antibiotics and various gels to apply on that abscess. I have to have this dressing changed everyday until the abscess heals…. So, everyday I am stuffed with gauze and pray that I don’t leak that nasty stuff…. 😉

So, as they say – it’s not over, until it’s over! 🙂 I have got one more experience in the battle with the evil carcinoma, but I do hope it’s the last one!

When I felt better in hospital, I played with my mobile, as usual – it is a good sign when I have the drive to take photos; it definitely means I am on the mend! 🙂 Here are some shots from this visit to my second temporary home:

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I am feeling a lot better now, just looking forward to not having to be seen by a doctor or a nurse! To reset my mind a bit, I went to see ‘The Great Gatsby’ today and I thoroughly enjoyed it, because I too am a dreamer, but I focus on the present and do not want to relive the past. Carpe diem is what I am into! 🙂

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